Top Industries Using Commercial Drones

Top Industries Using Commercial Drones (Infographic)

The drone services market is expected to reach over $127 billion dollars by the year 2020. As drone technology soars this new high-demand service provides small and large companies the ability to capture images that were once too time consuming, costly, or logistically impossible. See how the top industries are using commercial drones to improve work productivity to their businesses in our latest drone infographic.

Top Industries Using Commercial Drones (Infographic)

The Drone Revolution is Disrupting These Top Industries

Film/Photography. Drones are available to capture stunning aerial images and footage offering a new visual language.
Real Estate. From skyscrapers to golf courses, drones can photograph, prospect, and help agents advertise their properties.
News. Ability to deploy drones to cover breaking news, disasters, or war zones.
Construction Sites. Drones can monitor and survey construction progress.
First Responders. Drones are used for a variety of things ranging from forest fire fighting to disaster site rescues.
Law Enforcement. Drones can be used to combat drug trafficking across borders, bomb threats, and search and rescue operations.
Climate/Science Research. Drones assist in everything from weather patterns to counting wildlife and heard movements anywhere on the planet.
Energy. Energy companies can monitor miles of pipelines and oil rigs.
Agriculture. Drones can collect real-time data on crop health and yields.
Package Delivery. Drones can deliver food and medical supplies to remote villages around the world.

Drone Technology Advancements

As technology progresses, here are some of advancements we can expect to see developed in drones:
Increased battery life
3D mapping
Better precision
Consumer package delivery
Bandwidth availability
Obstacle avoidance
Facial recognition
Increased coverage

Interesting Drone Facts

195 UAV manufactures
U.S. controls 35% of the drone market, compared to 30% for Europe, 15% for China, and 20% for the rest of the world
Seven million consumer and commercial drones could be shipped in the U.S. by 2020
Three million drones could be flying in China by 2019
Drone manufacturing and operation could create 100,000 new jobs within 10-15 years
47 percent of Americans are interested in drone deliveries
Photography is the top industry using drones in the U.S.
Real estate is the second largest industry using drones in the U.S.

About Skyvireo

Skyvireo.com is a Global Media Desk company, dedicated to providing clients with the highest quality, most cost-effective drone services around the world. Our constant striving for perfection in the way we provide drone services has led to new and exciting ways to better serve our customers. Above all, our aim is to provide clients with a hassle-free experience that will save them time, money, and eliminate frustration.

Drone Regulations What you Need to Know

Drone Regulations: What You Need to Know (UPDATED)

Drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have become a growing equipment trend in aerial photography and film. The possibilities of shooting with drones are endless and hold the promise of new creative options, real cost savings and possibly even safer sets.  But before you go out and buy or hire the most expensive drone you can afford, you need to know the laws that come with commercial drone use.

The laws that regulate commercial use of drones vary from country to country.  Some countries require permits and have very strict regulations about drone use while others are more open.  Check out our overview of country regulations on drones:

North America

Canada

The Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) require unmanned air vehicle (UAV) operators to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC).

When flying a UAV (non-recreational drone) in Canada, you must:

  • follow the rules in the Canadian Aviation Regulations:
  • section 602.41 – Unmanned air vehicles
  • respect the Criminal Code, your provincial Trespass Act, as well as all applicable municipal, provincial, and territorial laws that apply

For more information visit Transport Canada.

Mexico

Basic drone laws:

  • All drone flights must be operated in daylight only
  • There are no laws on operating drones weighing under 2kg other than they cannot be used at night
  • A permit is required for operation of drones weighing between 2kg and 25kg
  • A permit and pilot license are required for operation of drones weighing over 25kg
  • Despite the lack of Mexican drone laws you should still be careful when operating a done in Mexico. Try to maintain visual contact with your drone at all times and avoid flying over large crowds or near airports.

For more information visit http://www.sct.gob.mx/transporte-y-medicina-preventiva/aeronautica-civil/inicio/

United States

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) outlines the following as basic things an operator must know for flying under the small UAS rule (14 CFR part 107):

Pilot Requirements:

  • Must be at least 16 years old
  • Must pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center+
  • Must be vetted by the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA)

Aircraft Requirements:

Operating Rules:

  • Class G airspace*
  • Must keep the aircraft in sight (visual line-of-sight)*
  • Must fly under 400 feet*
  • Must fly during the day*
  • Must fly at or below 100 mph*
  • Must yield right of way to manned aircraft*
  • Must NOT fly over people*
  • Must NOT fly from a moving vehicle*

* All of these rules are subject to waiver

To fly a UAS that weighs 55 lbs. or more, operators will need to use the existing Section 333 exemption process.

For more information visit the Federal Aviation Administration.

South America

Brazil

Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil (ANAC) approved the Brazilian Regulation of Special Civil Aviation, which regulates the civil operation of remotely piloted aircraft, drones.

  • drones cannot be used at a distance of less than 30 horizontal meters (approximately 100 feet) of people without their consent, except in cases of public security or civil defense operations.
  • drones weighing more than 150 kilograms (about 330 pounds) must undergo a certification process similar to that existing for manned aircraft and must be registered in the Registro Aeronáutico Brasileiro.  Pilots must be over 18 years of age and must have a medical-aeronautical certificate, drone license, and authorization/operator’s license.
  • drones weighing between 25 kilos (about 55 pounds) and 150 kilos must be in conformity with technical requirements prescribed for manufacturers. Operators must be at least 18 years old and have a medical-aeronautical certificate, drone license, and operator’s license.
  • drones weighing between 250 grams (about 0.5 pounds) and 25 kilos need only be registered with the ANAC if operated up to 120 meters (about 394 feet)  above the ground. For equipment weighing under 250 grams there are no requirements in the Regulation.

For more information visit Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil.

Europe

Germany

Operation of the following drones and model aircraft requires an authorization to fly granted by the relevant state aviation authority and usually valid for two years:

  • drones or model aircraft weighing more than five kilograms;
  • rocket-powered drones and model aircrafts whose propellant mass exceeds 20 grams;
  • drones and model aircraft with a combustion engine, if they are flown within 1.5 kilometers of a residential area;
  • drones and model aircraft of all kinds if they are flown within 1.5 kilometers of an airport (flight at airports requires an additional clearance from German Aviation Control); and
  • drones and model aircraft of all kinds if flown at “night,” defined by the EU Implementing Regulation as the hours “between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight.”

Drones and model aircrafts cannot be operated:

  • within 100 meters of or above people and public gatherings, the scene of an accident, disaster zones, other sites of operation of police or other organizations with security-related duties, and military drill sites;
  • within 100 meters of or above correctional facilities, military complexes, industrial complexes, power plants, and power generation and distribution facilities;
  • within 100 meters of or above the property of federal or state governments, diplomatic or consular missions, international organizations, and law enforcement and security agencies;
  • within 100 meters of or above federal highways, federal waterways, and railway systems;
  • above nature reserves;
  • above 100 meters;
  • above residential property if the drone or model aircraft weighs more than 0.25 kilograms or if it is able to receive, transmit, or record optical, acoustic, or radio signals;
  • in controlled airspace;
  • within 100 meters of or above hospitals.

The aviation authority may grant an exception to the general prohibitions in justified cases.

For more information visit Luftfahrt Bundesamt (LBA).

Norway

Use of drones is regulated by Luftfartstilsynet Civil Aviation Authority Norway.  There are three operator categories, based on weight and flight.

RO1
RO 1 operators must notify the CAA Norway before starting up any new undertaking. Such notification shall contain information about the undertaking’s name, address and contact information, as well as information about the type of aircraft that will be used.

An RO 1 undertaking is an undertaking in which aircraft

  • with an MTOM of up to 2.5 kg and
  • a maximum speed of 60 knots
  • will be operated exclusively within VLOS during daylight hours and subject to fixed safety distances

RO2

RO 2 operators must obtain a license from the CAA Norway before starting up an undertaking. The application must be accompanied by a risk analysis and an operations manual.

An RO 2 undertaking is an undertaking in which aircraft

  • with an MTOM of up to 25 kg and
  • a maximum speed of 80 knots
  • will be used for VLOS or EVLOS operations during daylight hours and subject to fixed safety distances

RO3

RO 3 operators must obtain a license from the CAA Norway before starting up an undertaking. The application must be accompanied by a risk analysis and an operations manual.

An RO 3 undertaking is an undertaking in which the aircraft

  • have an MTOM of 25 kg or more, or
  • a maximum speed of 80 knots, or
  • is operated by a turbine engine, or
  • will be used for BLOS operations at altitudes of more than 120 metres, or
  • will operate in controlled airspace at altitudes of more than 120 metres, or
  • will operate over or in the vicinity of crowds of people other than in the cases mentioned in Section 51 third paragraph.

For more information visit Luftfartstilsynet Civil Aviation Authority Norway.

Switzerland

For the operation of drones and model aircraft with a weight of more than 30 kilograms a permit has to be obtained from the FOCA. In each individual case the FOCA specifies the applicable requirements and operating conditions. The criteria for the operation of drones and model aircraft with a weight of up to 30 kilograms are specified in the DETEC Ordinance on Special Categories of Aircraft.

  • If an operator wants to incorporate auxiliary devices such as binoculars or video goggles in order to extend the natural visual range, a permit has to be obtained from the FOCA (Licensing procedure).
  • Without exception, the operation of drones and model aircraft is strictly prohibited within game reserves and bird sanctuaries.
  • The recording of aerial images is permitted as long as the operator duly observes the regulations governing the protection of military installations. The operator must also observe the principle of protection of privacy and the provisions of the Federal Data Protection Act.
  • In principle, drones may not be operated above, or within a radius of 100 metres from, gatherings of people (Further information and licensing procedure).
  • Anyone who operates a drone or model aircraft with a weight of more than 500 grams is required to take out liability insurance cover in the amount of at least 1 million Swiss francs to cover any damages that may be caused.
  • Restrictions apply with respect to the operation of drones and model aircraft in the vicinity of airfields and airports. For example, it is prohibited to operate such devices at a distance of less than 5 kilometres from runways.
  • Cantonal and municipal authorities may impose additional restrictions on the use of unmanned aircraft (Example of the Canton of Geneva).
  • As before, a permit does not have to be obtained from the FOCA for public air shows at which exclusively model aircraft and drones are on show.

For more information visit the Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA).

United Kingdom

Regulations are contained within the Air Navigation Order 2016 (ANO 2016) and there are specific steps that must be taken if a drone is being flown for commercial operations.

  • You must have a Permission issued by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) before you conduct any commercial operations with your drone.
  • Applications should be made on the standard form SRG 1320 and information should also be supplied about the scope of the operation and where and when it will take place. In the majority of cases, only the ‘standard’ CAA permission is granted and this favours aircraft weighing no more than 7kg (15 lbs). Any aircraft weighing more than 20kg (44 lbs) are subject to a more involved process and are more difficult to approve. How to apply for a Permission.

Further Guidance on drone operations within UK airspace can be found at the UK guidance document CAP 722.

Oceania

Australia

Drones under 2kg need to notify CASA at least five business days before their first commercial flight and agree to operate by the standard operating conditions and the guidance in advisory circular (AC) 101-10.

Under the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) weighing 2kg or less must fly:

  • less than 400 feet (121m) in a controlled airspace (generally meaning any populated area)
  • only in good weather conditions; not into a cloud or at night.
  • more than 10m horizontally and 30 feet (9 metres) vertically of a person (except people
  • operating the drone) or boat or building
  • at a height far enough over a large group of people that if the drone failed or any of its components fall, they will not land on people
  • clear of prohibited or restricted areas (such as an aerodrome or restricted military areas)

If you want to fly a drone commercially in Australia weighing more than 2kg, then you will need to obtain a remote pilot license (RePL), and an RPA operator’s certificate (ReOC).

For detailed information or for certification, visit the Civil Aviation Safety Authority website.

New Zealand

The Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand (CAA) oversees the use of drones in New Zealand:

  • RPAS weighing between 15 and 25 kg must be constructed or inspected, approved and operated under the authority of a person or association approved for this purpose by the Director of Civil Aviation.
  • For RPAS over 25kg you must submit an ‘exposition’ showing that you have identified hazards and risks of your operation, and will always mitigate those risks. Each application will be considered on its merit.
  • An operator must not use airspace above people unless they have the consent of people below the flight.
  • An operator must not use airspace above an area of property unless prior consent has been obtained from any persons occupying that property or the property owner.

You can apply to the CAA to work though different options with an operator and/or to relax or remove one or both of the consent requirements altogether.

For more information visit the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand.

Asia

Hong Kong

The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) is responsible for processing applications for non-recreational operations of drones within Hong Kong.

Application

  • An application for operating UAS shall be submitted to the CAD well before the intended date of operation. The electronic form is accessible through this link.
  • In accordance with the Air Transport (Licensing of Air Services) Regulations (Chapter 448A of the Laws of Hong Kong) Regulation 22, the applicant is also required to submit an Application for Permit for use of aircraft for the provision of air service – Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).
  • The operator is required to assess the risks involved and to provide a copy of an insurance policy that appropriately insures the operator in respect of third party risks which may be incurred.

Pilot Qualification
Evidence of pilot competency is required when making an application for permission to operate UAS

Operations Manual

  • The UAS operator is required to submit an operations manual covering the procedures to be followed for all envisaged operations of the UAS. This document is a key requirement to enable CAD to accurately assess the application and the safety case before deciding whether to grant a permission.
  • Guidance for the compilation of the UAS operations manual can be downloaded here.

Communication with ATC

  • The UAS operator shall inform the CAD/Aerodrome Supervisor before launching and on completion of the UAS operation.
  • The UAS operator shall provide his/her contact phone number to the CAD/Aerodrome Supervisor, who may instruct to stop the operation when necessary.

Japan

The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MILT) has issued the following regulations for drone use in Japan:

Prohibited Airspace for Flight
Any person who intends to operate a UAV in the following airspace is required to obtain permission from the Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

  • Airspace around airports and above certain heights above ground level.
  • Above densely populated areas (4,000 people per square kilometer or more).

Operational Limitations
Any person who intends to operate a UAV is required to follow the operational conditions listed below, unless approved by the Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

  • Operation of UAVs in the daytime.
  • Operation of UAVs within Visual Line of Sight (VLOS).
  • Maintenance of a certain operating distance between UAVs and persons or properties on the ground/ water surface.
  • Do not operate UAVs over event sites where many people gather.
  • Do not transport hazardous materials such as explosives by UAV.
  • Do not drop any objects from UAVs.

For more information visit the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

Africa

South Africa

An RPA must be registered and may only be operated in terms of Part 101 of the South African Civil Aviation Regulations.

Do not fly/operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft, or toy aircraft 50 m or closer from:

  • Any person or group of persons (like sports field, road races, schools, social events, etc.)
  • Any property without permission from the property owner.

Unless approved by the SACAA, DO NOT fly/operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft or toy aircraft:

  • Near manned aircraft
  • 10 km or closer to an aerodrome (airport, helipad, airfield)
  •  Weighing more than 7 kg
  • In controlled airspace
  • In restricted airspace
  • In prohibited airspace.

Do not fly/operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft, or toy aircraft higher than 150 ft from the ground, unless approved by the Director of Civil Aviation of the SACAA.

For more information visit the South African Civil Aviation Authority.

About Skyvireo

Skyvireo.com is a Global Media Desk company, dedicated to providing clients with the highest quality, most cost-effective drone services around the world. Our constant striving for perfection in the way we provide drone services has led to new and exciting ways to better serve our customers. Above all, our aim is to provide clients with a hassle-free experience that will save them time, money, and eliminate frustration.

The Olympics Games- Rio 2016 by the Numbers

The Olympics Games: Rio 2016 by the Numbers

For 17 days this summer the world will come together to watch the biggest sporting event on the planet. Brought to you by over 140,000 TV and broadcast stations around the world, let’s take a look at the numbers projected to break broadcasting and social media records.

The Olympic Games: Rio 2016 by the Numbers

Need Coverage for an Upcoming Sporting Event?

Global Media Desk has local crews, photographers, and satellite services in Brazil and throughout the world, who are ready to get you the coverage you need. Find out more about this year’s biggest sporting event and how Global Media Desk can help: http://videoproductionbrazil.com/sports-events-production-services/.

About Global Media Desk

Global Media Desk has been providing on-demand, high-quality, local satellite and up-link services, production crews, photographers, and interpreters in Brazil and around the world for over 15 years. We have seen and done it all, so please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have about events in a specific country or region. Ready to hire the best local crew for you project? Fill out our free quote form and you can have access to the highest-quality crews. It is as simple as point. click. covered.

 

DISCLAIMER: “Olympic”, “Olympic Games”, and “Rio 2016” are registered properties of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this site. Any reference to “Olympic”, “Olympic Games”, or “Rio 2016” is used purely for editorial and informational purposes.

Resources:
ZenithOptimedia
BMI Research
OlympicGames.org

Photo Credits:
Antimarino Track Field by David Fulmer on Flickr
FIFA FanFest Cuiabá by Paulisson Miura on Flickr
Beach by Brazil Women’s Beach Volleyball on Flickr
Morro do Pão de Açúcar by Rodrigo Soldon on Flickr

Infographic: Broadcast Firsts at the Olympics

Infographic: Broadcast Firsts at the Olympics

Thanks to the growth of broadcast media technology, more of the world can join in the celebration of sportsmanship and athletic achievements that is the Olympic Games. From the historically triumphant gold medal wins of Jesse Owens in 1936, to the record breaking achievements of Michael Phelps in 2008, innovations in broadcasting have allowed for everyone to experience the thrill of the Games.

Infographic: Broadcast Firsts at the Olympics

Need Coverage for an Upcoming Sporting Event?

Global Media Desk has local crews, photographers, and satellite services in Brazil and throughout the world, who are ready to get you the coverage you need. Click here to find out more about this year’s biggest sporting event and how Global Media Desk can help: http://videoproductionbrazil.com/sports-events-production-services/.

About Global Media Desk

Global Media Desk has been providing on-demand, high-quality, local satellite and up-link services, production crews, photographers, and interpreters in Brazil and around the world for over 15 years. We have seen and done it all, so please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have about events in a specific country or region. Ready to hire the best local crew for you project? Fill out our free quote form and you can have access to the highest-quality crews. It is as simple as point. click. covered.

DISCLAIMER: “Olympic”, “Olympic Games”, and “Rio 2016” are registered properties of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this site. Any reference to “Olympic”, “Olympic Games”, or “Rio 2016” is used purely for editorial and informational purposes.

Throwback Thursday – 2014 World Cup Games in Brazil

Throwback Thursday – 2014 World Cup Games in Brazil

It’s Thursday! Not just Thursday, but Throwback Thursday and we would like to share one of our favorite recent media assignments. In 2014, we were contacted by a Bosnian TV channel looking to cover the Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team during their first-ever trip to the Football World Cup. Having local, experienced crews in Brazil, we were able to provide our client with a local producer, satellite truck, and up-link services to broadcast highlights live after the matches.

As if it wasn’t cool enough to cover the Football World Cup, it was extra special to provide services for a TV channel covering their country’s first appearance. We can just imagine the excitement of the fans watching the highlights back home. Although the BiH men’s national football team did not make it out of the first round, they definitely made an impression on the media who called them an exciting team to watch.

Love Note from Our Client:
“Thank you very much for everything you did. Our team was very pleased with the service provided.”
– Sulejman M., FACETV

Latest News: Upcoming Sporting Event in Rio

August 5 – 21, 2016
More than 10,500 athletes from 206 countries will take part in this year’s biggest sporting event in Rio. It will feature 306 events in 28 sports and take place in 33 venues spread across the four regions of the city.

Did you know that the Global Media Desk has local crews throughout Brazil who are always ready to get you the coverage you need? Click here to find out more about upcoming sporting events in Rio: http://videoproductionbrazil.com/sports-events-production-services/.

About Global Media Desk

Global Media Desk has been providing on-demand, high-quality, local satellite and up-link services, production crews, photographers, and interpreters in Brazil and around the world for over 15 years. We have seen and done it all, so please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have about events in a specific country or region. Ready to hire the best local crew for you project? Fill out our free quote form and you can have access to the highest-quality crews. It is as simple as point. click. covered.

Photo credit: AC Moraes on Flickr

Simple Tips for Better Nighttime Photos with a Smartphone

Simple Tips for Better Nighttime Photos with a Smartphone

Lit up by fireworks, stars, and the glowing moon, the summer night sky can be a pretty spectacular sight. But capturing those breathtaking views when you don’t have your trusty DSLR can be more than a little frustrating.  With just a few simple tips you can photograph the night sky with your phone like a pro and say goodbye to grainy dark photos.

Find the Perfect Spot

For the best pictures, finding your ideal photo position is the first step. If you are photographing fireworks, scope out the area beforehand and find the best vantage point. Be prepared if it’s a windy night. Smoke could affect the look of your photos.

Keep It Steady

Using a tripod can keep your phone steady, which is essential in low-light conditions. There are numerous smartphone adapters and tripods available on the market ranging from $10 to $50 depending on your preference.

Keep in mind we don’t recommend the ‘selfie-stick,’ since plenty of places have chosen to ban them. Just check the rules before packing for your trip.

Turn Off Flash, HDR or Zoom

The flash on most smartphones only lights up about 10 feet in front of you, which can turn the crowd and the night sky into an abyss of darkness. The HDR setting will only slow down your camera phone, which is exactly what you don’t want during a fireworks show. Try avoiding the zoom feature, as it will reduce the image quality and add more graininess to your photos.

Night Camera Apps

If you are using an iPhone’s native camera app with iOS 8, there’s a new tool for manually adjusting the exposure of your photos. Simply tap and hold the screen, when the AE/AF LOCK pops up, scroll up or down for your desired exposure.

AE AF Effects IOS8 360

You can also try downloading a third-party app like NightCap or Night Modes for iOS, Camera FV-5 for Android, or CameraPro for Windows Phones, offering more flexibility.

NightCap: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nightcap/id486414195?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D8
Night Modes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/night-modes/id572215621?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D8
Camera FV-5: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.flavionet.android.camera.pro&hl=en
CameraPro: http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/camerapro/ee7b9093-62ec-48f5-9364-1b192509c86f

Set ISO to Low if Using a Tripod

Some phones, such as the Samsung Galaxy, already offer a night mode or manual control of ISO settings. If you are using a tripod, set the ISO to a low value such as 100 or lower to get the best results.   If you are not using a tripod, then a higher ISO would be a better option.  Experiment beforehand to make sure you get the most out of your nighttime photos.

Bonus Tip: Accessorize Your Phone

If you are really serious about photo taking with your phone, there are tons of add-ons to make your smartphone camera act like a DSLR. From fisheye to optical zoom lenses, these extras can offer both versatility and quality to your phone’s camera.

Share Your Best Photos With Us!

Whether you are photographing fireworks this weekend for a Fourth of July celebration, or just inspired by a clear night, we want to see your photos! Use the hashtag #GMD_NightLife to share your favorite photos with us.

About Global Media Desk

At the Global Media Desk we have been helping organize successful photoshoots around the world for fifteen years. We have seen and done it all! Please contact us with any questions you may have about shooting in a specific country or request a free online quote to see how we can make your photoshoot a complete success.

By Danilo Borges/copa2014.gov.br Licença Creative Commons Atribuição 3.0 Brasil

4 Ways Sporting Events are Upping the Game in Digital Marketing

Engagement, passion and connection are what turn your average customer into a devoted fan. No industry understands this more than the sports industry. Sporting events from around the world are finding new and inventive ways for technology and media to create new fans and we all can learn a few tricks from the experts.

Drones

Aerial photography and video is the wave of the future and the sports industry is charging full steam ahead. All access angles, impossible shots and never before seen footage are just a few of the ways fans are being introduced to a whole new look inside their favorite teams. The Sacramento Kings are prospecting the use of drones for exclusive in-arena camera angles and instant replays to be delivered straight to their fans’ smartphones. Digital Marketing tip: Drones can give a new spin on an old concept. Use it to give your customers an exclusive view.

Social Media

A recent study by Cisco found that 57% of sports fans prefer to watch games at home on their television. So how do you engage with a fan who is sitting at home? Until recently it was almost impossible, but now social media makes it easy. Platforms like Instagram, Snap Chat and Facebook provide a plethora of ways to make fans a part of the experience by sharing videos, comments, content and photos. Digital Marketing tip: Social media is your front line to engage with customers. Use it to turn a passive customer into an active one.

Mobile Technology

Imagine getting an alert on your phone as soon as you walk into a stadium notifying you a seat upgrade is available to purchase directly on your phone. Once seated, you use your smartphone to order up a plate of nachos and beer to be delivered right to your seat, never missing the action. And, when nature calls, bring up the stadium’s app to direct you to the nearest restroom with the smallest wait time. In case you do miss an important play, use your phone to watch an instant replay via the stadium-exclusive video feed. These are all technologies being integrated into smart-arenas all over the world to keep you connected to the thing you love – the game. Digital Marketing tip: The possibilities for mobile technology are endless! Use it to make your customer’s experience as quick, helpful, easy and care-free as possible.

Mobile Video

With 70% of fans bringing a mobile device to the stadium, capturing this new “second screen” viewing system  opened up a whole new avenue for marketing to sport fans. The NBA partnered with YouTube to host highlight compilations and recaps of recent games to let fans watch on demand. Some stadiums even include special fan invitations to pre-game warm-ups and post-game press conferences. Digital Marketing tip: Mobile video marketing should be a part of every marketing plan. Use it to capture your customer’s attention at every phase.

Want to find out more?

At the Global Media Desk we have been providing video production crews, photography, and drone services for global sporting events around the world for fifteen years. Please contact us for future media needs for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, UEFA Euro 2016 in France, 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia or other global sporting events.

Follow us on social media for news, advice, info, and tips about production, photography, and language services:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglobalmediadesk
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalmediadesk
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Globalmediadesk
Instagram: http://instagram.com/globalmediadesk
Tumblr: http://globalmediadesk.tumblr.com/

Photo credit: By Danilo Borges/copa2014.gov.br Licença Creative Commons Atribuição 3.0 Brasil [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Gathering Your Tech Gear to Film Abroad

Gathering Your Tech Gear to Film Abroad

When traveling abroad for international film productions and photoshoots, having a travel checklist is essential to ensure a smooth and trouble-free shoot. At the top of that checklist should be the necessary adapters and plugs you will need for any equipment you will be bringing from home. Mismatch in the power or charging gear can be a real headache and cost you time and money if you aren’t prepared. Check out our advice on what you need to know about carrying tech gear for international shoots.

Power standard discrepancies

While 110 volt is the power standard employed in North America, most other countries practice a 220- volt standard. You may need a different plug type and adapter when you travel abroad. Luckily, you should be able to find these power adapters in most countries in Europe or Asia. However, if you’re traveling to South/Central America or Africa, it would do you good to carry different power gear. You could try purchasing battery packs in the market that are designed for the latest DSR cameras, and use standard alkaline batteries. You could also carry a multimeter that can pinpoint the power in the batteries or plug. While we’re on the topic of multimeters, make sure yours can read up to 240 volts or higher. Detailed List on Voltage Requirements

Lighting gear

You might want to carry some lighting equipment on your trip, unless you will only be filming outdoors. It is technically not that difficult, as you can carry LED lights to do the job. Some of the new crop LEDs run completely on rechargeable packs or alkaline batteries. They are lightweight portable and provide quality lighting. Also the lighting kit that you currently own can be switched up to a voltage-level that matches the power standards of the country that you’re traveling to; make sure you ask your light kit manufacturer about the same.

Researching about the destination

If you’re carrying a considerable amount of video equipment on the trip, it is likely that you will be charged an additional fee at customs. Be sure to research on the location beforehand so you get a good understanding of its customs, travel restrictions and other information. Also, do your homework on the cultural issues and etiquette. You’ll be surprised that there are some destinations around the world where cameras, no matter how small they are, are not allowed. Knowing how the local customs function can give you a better chance at capturing some memorable shots.

To avoid customs duties when bringing large amounts of gear across borders, you might want to consider getting an ATA Carnet. For more information, learn more about how ATA Carnets work: http://www.iccwbo.org/chamber-services/trade-facilitation/ata-carnets/

At the Global Media Desk we highly recommend that you use local crews whenever possible. Local crews have their own equipment with the correct voltage and without the hassle of customs. You also get an expert in area to help make it a fun and memorable shoot. Contact us for more information about local crews for your international video production or photoshoot.

Best Filming Locations in the U.S.

Hollywood’s Film Location Trends 2014

Producers often walk a tightrope between keeping production costs in check and ensuring that the quality and authenticity of the movie doesn’t suffer in any way. They’ve increasingly been looking at ‘greener pastures’ away from California that offer lucrative film tax incentives while also serving as good locations for physical production.

A latest example of the growing trend of big budget movies turning to overseas locales is the upcoming (2015) $100 million thriller ‘San Andreas’ starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Interestingly, the movie explores the aftermath of a massive 10.0 earthquake in San Francisco. Instead of SF, the movie will be shot in Australia’s Gold Coast. Another example is the $70 million flick ‘Battle: Los Angeles’ that was shot in Louisiana. So, what does Louisiana have that LA doesn’t?

Louisiana is the #1 spot for Hollywood movie production

In 2013, Louisiana zoomed past New York and California as the most preferred movie production destination for Hollywood movies. It formally introduced film tax incentives in 2002, and currently offers a 30 per cent transferable tax credit to all productions that meet a $300,000 in-state budget threshold. By comparison, California rolled out incentives in 2009 and it was slim pickings until a legislative change in August this year increased the credits pool from a previous $100 million to $330 million per year. However, it may have come a bit late given that the state lost over 15,000 film jobs between 2004 and 2012.

Meanwhile, production costs on major feature films in LA have shot up significantly in recent years. Filming in town has become financially unviable for producers.

Canada remains a favorite

Canada’s biggest conquest following its tax credit incentive program in 1997 was ‘Titanic’. Top-grossing movies such as ‘Brokeback Mountain’, ‘Mean Girls’ and ‘Chicago’ followed suit. The country presently offers a refundable federal tax credit equivalent to 16 per cent of qualified residential labor costs. If you factor in provincial offers, the overall credits can climb up to 70 per cent of eligible labor costs and 30 per cent of miscellaneous local expenses.

Hollywood movies being shot in Canada this year include Robert Zemeckis’ ‘The Walk’ starring Joseph Gordon Levitt, Roland Emmerich’s ‘Stonewall’, and John Crowley’s ‘Brooklyn’.

States that have cut back on film tax incentives

Michigan and North Carolina recently slashed their state tax credits, and have consequently witnessed a fall in Hollywood production. NC, which has hosted such major productions as ‘Hunger Games’ looks set to lose HBO hit ‘Homeland’, which has so far been filmed in and around Charlotte.

No matter where your filming takes you finding qualified and reliable local production crews is a must!  At the Global Media Desk we work with the finest, most respected local professionals in cities and countries around the world. Our production crews have the experience, creativity and know-how to make them the very best in the business.  Contact us to find out how we can help make your production a success.

video production trends

Video Production Trends to Watch Out For

Quality content is what makes the world go round. And for the professionals looking to bring it to life, the 2014 NAB Show directs the way! Hosted by the National Association of Broadcasters, the NAB Show is the world’s largest electronic media show covering the creation, management and delivery of content across all platforms. This year’s event in Las Vegas had more than 98,000 attendees from 150 countries and 1,600+ exhibitors. As you can imagine several emerging technologies and the latest innovations came into light during the event.

Unification of 4K and Internet video

NAB 2014 exhibited the march of evolution towards 4K video and Internet broadcasting. Manufacturers of the two products are planning a unified experience of the two seemingly opposite areas. A new codec: H.265 has already been made available this year. It is estimated that H.265 will substitute H.264 as the compression standard for next generation. The present container or wrapper for the H.264 is MPEG-4. For H.265, the new container is High Efficiency Video Codec (HEVC). It is not only twice the compression ratio of H.264, but can also support files up to 8K. Manufacturers are expected to adopt it from the end of 2014.

Integrated solutions for online video

The number of video platforms offering an integrated solution is increasing. New entrants have increased and are joining the platform centric multi-bitrate streaming firms. Many companies are offering a wider range of platform services and also options for distribution like adaptive video streaming, video analytics, hosting and encoding.

LED and the lighting revolution

Litepanels brought into the market the Sola line fresnels, a LED line that utilizes only a fraction of power which the fresnels in the 20th century consumed. Another new line called Celeb 400 has been launched, which is a worthy successor to the LED Celeb 200. The new line not only promises the adjustment of luminance, but also the color temperature. It enables quick decision making on whether to make a balance for Daylight, Tungsten lighting or any other factor between the two.

Independents and remote broadcasting

Creative agencies and independent videographers now have a number of compact ways by which they can broadcast directly from the ENG shoot. Many companies have even launched backpack cellular solutions. A substantial range of protocols like HLS, RTMP and RTP permit you to stream high definition videos directly to the web via 4G or LTE USB modem or WiFi.