Our Savvy Guide to Filming Abroad

Our Savvy Guide to Filming Abroad

As anyone in this industry knows, filming can be a complex business, with obstacles and hurdles to overcome even for the shortest project. Filming abroad can present very specific challenges as well as rewards, with plenty of research to be done ahead of time.

When done correctly however, venturing beyond your borders can be a once in-a-lifetime event. So how do you ensure a drama-free shoot in a foreign country? We have put together a list of tips, tricks and advice to make your shoot abroad a complete and total success.

1. Plan ahead

When arranging crews, permits, visas, travel, hotels and other services, book as far in advance as possible. Booking ahead of time will ensure that you get the best rates and save a lot of money.

Also, don’t forget the time difference. If you’re reading this during the daytime in the United States, it is already evening in Europe. And in Asia, it’s already tomorrow. So, if you happen to be organising a shoot in either of these regions, and you’re based in Berlin, you’re already a day behind.

2. Things you need before you travel

Some countries require visas to be obtained in advance. This process can take anything from one week to one month to complete. Visit VisaHQ for country specific information.

Another vital point to remember before you travel is that voltage and power outlets vary around the world. You should have the right plug adapters and power converters before setting off. Most plug adapters do not convert the power.

Laptops and video cameras usually have built-in converters, but you will need to buy a separate power converter for all other devices. If your voltages don’t match you could end up blowing a fuse. You can find a list of electrical systems around the world here.

3. Go local

By working with local film crews in the country or region you are shooting in, you end up killing two birds with one stone.

First of all, you reduce or eliminate travel expenses considerably, and save on having to ship in large amounts of equipment. This can often incur customs fees, not to mention the hefty extra baggage charges at check-in.

Local crew = local knowledge. Secondly, and most importantly, you will be working with people who know the local terrain, language, and customs. This kind of local knowledge is the single most effective way of reducing potential problems, because your locally based team will know how to avoid country-specific risks.

4. Know the local laws, customs, do’s & don’ts

Imagine your reaction if your production had to be shut down because you did not get the right permit, or decided to shoot on a major local holiday when everything was closed? What would happen if you chose to shoot on a forbidden location, or didn’t follow the specific local shooting code?

You can spend quite a lot of time researching the filming laws in your destination country, checking with the local film commissions and other government organizations. Alternatively, hire a local fixer, scout or production assistant who knows the right people and permits, and who can take care of everything prior to your arrival, thus saving you valuable time.

5. Have fun

Don’t forget what a gift it is to travel and to have the opportunity to discover new places and people. If possible, schedule some time to get out there and explore a little.

Your local crew will probably have some great advice on places to visit in the area. Enjoy yourself; you won’t regret it.

Need help planning your next film production project?

Let us help!  At the Global Media Desk we specialize in bringing your visions to life.  We only work with the top regional professionals in such varied fields as video production, photography, and film & video crews. Please  contact us with any questions you may have about shooting in Canada or any country around the world. You can also request a free online quote to see how we can make your project a complete success.

Follow us on social media for news, advice, info, and tips about international film production, photography, and language services:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglobalmediadesk 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalmediadesk
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Globalmediadesk
Instagram: http://instagram.com/globalmediadesk

This post was originally published in August 2014. Updated in April 2018.

3 Reasons to a Hire Local Crew Instead of Traveling to Your Shoot

3 Reasons to Hire a Local Crew Instead of Traveling to Your Shoot

So you’re a video production company owner or video producer and you just sold a shoot that is in a different city or country. For a newer company, the prospect of this can be exciting; you get to travel, you get to post to your instagram story about your trip, and you get to see new places and get paid while doing it. But after you’ve done it 5, 10, 20 times the light of excitement of out of town shoots could start to dim, leaving you indifferent on actually wanting to travel to a shoot.

At this point, you start to have to consider; should I hire local talent to shoot my project or should I go/send a team out to capture it? Of course, there are too many variables to give one answer, but in this article we’ll outline three main points as to why it’s usually best to hire local talent instead of traveling to your shoot. Here are the three reasons you should hire local video talent instead of traveling:

    1. Project Budget
      At the end of the day it is simply less expensive for the client and your production to hire local talent. For the average crew of 1-5 people, the cost of flights, hotels, travel meals, non-shooting travel days, etc is just not worth the difference of hiring local.

      Unless your project has an extremely particular look that is nearly impossible to replicate, or requires very specific shooters – there’s almost never a time where it’s less expensive to fly you or the team to the shoot.

      Say you have a one day, one person shoot in Atlanta, and you’re a corporate video production company in Cleveland. In order to fly in and shoot you’re looking at least $500 in flight tickets, $150 in hotels, and $150 in food. Plus a staff members time at $30 an hour, brings your total cost to the client to at least $1200-1500, this doesn’t even include your markup.

      To book a local talent for a similar one person one day shoot would cost around $500-1000, at the most.

    2. Time
      It takes 60 minutes to book a freelancer or a local team and have them shoot a local production. It takes at least 48 hours to travel to an out of town shoot, shoot it, and come back. If you’re someone who values their time, especially as a business owner, you’re much better off booking local talent and saving yourself or your staff two days of your life.

      This time could be spent on business development, moving other projects forward, and improving your video production business – instead of sitting on a plane and in a hotel.

      In 48 hours of travel and shooting you could; complete 300 cold calls to new business, organize and execute a direct mail campaign, send 40 recruiting emails searching for new talent for your company, meet with 8 existing clients to chat about future projects, and many other things. Find a better way to spend your time than traveling.

    3. Talent
      You might of had a bad experience before, but chances are that with the right remote video production booking company, you’ll find people in other cities and countries that are actually better than you of your in-house staff. Finding the right talent is all about having the right connections and having trusted relationships in place. Using the right booking sites and services, you’ll be able to find talent even in the most remote parts of the world than have an even more expansive skill set than your staff.

      The best producers know what their crew is capable of outputting and is able to be cold as steel when choosing quality over friendship. Sometimes it’s nice and fun to work with people you like, but for the sake of excellence it’s sometimes imperative you book people that are simply just right for the job. By tapping into local talent in the city of your shoot, you’re able to nitpick and find the people that are experts in the very type of production you’re looking to execute on.

      So unless you’re doing it for personal reasons, there are many times that booking an outside freelancer for remote work is not only cheaper, faster, but also better quality. Of course, this doesn’t always work out getting all three, but if you know the right resources you’ll get 2 of the 3.

    About Global Media Desk

    The Global Media Desk has been helping producers and video production companies get better, more cost effective, and faster crews for productions around the world since 2000. We do this by tapping into our global network of creative video & photo talent that deliver world class production quality at the drop of the hat.    Please contact us  with any questions you may have about shooting in any  country  around the world. You can also  request a  free online quote  to see how we can make your project  a complete success.

Drone Regulations What you Need to Know

Drone Regulations: What You Need to Know (UPDATED)

Drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have become a growing equipment trend in aerial photography and film. The possibilities of shooting with drones are endless and hold the promise of new creative options, real cost savings and possibly even safer sets.  But before you go out and buy or hire the most expensive drone you can afford, you need to know the laws that come with commercial drone use.

The laws that regulate commercial use of drones vary from country to country.  Some countries require permits and have very strict regulations about drone use while others are more open.  Check out our overview of country regulations on drones:

North America

Canada

The Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) require unmanned air vehicle (UAV) operators to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC).

When flying a UAV (non-recreational drone) in Canada, you must:

  • follow the rules in the Canadian Aviation Regulations:
  • section 602.41 – Unmanned air vehicles
  • respect the Criminal Code, your provincial Trespass Act, as well as all applicable municipal, provincial, and territorial laws that apply

For more information visit Transport Canada.

Mexico

Basic drone laws:

  • All drone flights must be operated in daylight only
  • There are no laws on operating drones weighing under 2kg other than they cannot be used at night
  • A permit is required for operation of drones weighing between 2kg and 25kg
  • A permit and pilot license are required for operation of drones weighing over 25kg
  • Despite the lack of Mexican drone laws you should still be careful when operating a done in Mexico. Try to maintain visual contact with your drone at all times and avoid flying over large crowds or near airports.

For more information visit http://www.sct.gob.mx/transporte-y-medicina-preventiva/aeronautica-civil/inicio/

United States

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) outlines the following as basic things an operator must know for flying under the small UAS rule (14 CFR part 107):

Pilot Requirements:

  • Must be at least 16 years old
  • Must pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center+
  • Must be vetted by the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA)

Aircraft Requirements:

Operating Rules:

  • Class G airspace*
  • Must keep the aircraft in sight (visual line-of-sight)*
  • Must fly under 400 feet*
  • Must fly during the day*
  • Must fly at or below 100 mph*
  • Must yield right of way to manned aircraft*
  • Must NOT fly over people*
  • Must NOT fly from a moving vehicle*

* All of these rules are subject to waiver

To fly a UAS that weighs 55 lbs. or more, operators will need to use the existing Section 333 exemption process.

For more information visit the Federal Aviation Administration.

South America

Brazil

Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil (ANAC) approved the Brazilian Regulation of Special Civil Aviation, which regulates the civil operation of remotely piloted aircraft, drones.

  • drones cannot be used at a distance of less than 30 horizontal meters (approximately 100 feet) of people without their consent, except in cases of public security or civil defense operations.
  • drones weighing more than 150 kilograms (about 330 pounds) must undergo a certification process similar to that existing for manned aircraft and must be registered in the Registro Aeronáutico Brasileiro.  Pilots must be over 18 years of age and must have a medical-aeronautical certificate, drone license, and authorization/operator’s license.
  • drones weighing between 25 kilos (about 55 pounds) and 150 kilos must be in conformity with technical requirements prescribed for manufacturers. Operators must be at least 18 years old and have a medical-aeronautical certificate, drone license, and operator’s license.
  • drones weighing between 250 grams (about 0.5 pounds) and 25 kilos need only be registered with the ANAC if operated up to 120 meters (about 394 feet)  above the ground. For equipment weighing under 250 grams there are no requirements in the Regulation.

For more information visit Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil.

Europe

Germany

Operation of the following drones and model aircraft requires an authorization to fly granted by the relevant state aviation authority and usually valid for two years:

  • drones or model aircraft weighing more than five kilograms;
  • rocket-powered drones and model aircrafts whose propellant mass exceeds 20 grams;
  • drones and model aircraft with a combustion engine, if they are flown within 1.5 kilometers of a residential area;
  • drones and model aircraft of all kinds if they are flown within 1.5 kilometers of an airport (flight at airports requires an additional clearance from German Aviation Control); and
  • drones and model aircraft of all kinds if flown at “night,” defined by the EU Implementing Regulation as the hours “between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight.”

Drones and model aircrafts cannot be operated:

  • within 100 meters of or above people and public gatherings, the scene of an accident, disaster zones, other sites of operation of police or other organizations with security-related duties, and military drill sites;
  • within 100 meters of or above correctional facilities, military complexes, industrial complexes, power plants, and power generation and distribution facilities;
  • within 100 meters of or above the property of federal or state governments, diplomatic or consular missions, international organizations, and law enforcement and security agencies;
  • within 100 meters of or above federal highways, federal waterways, and railway systems;
  • above nature reserves;
  • above 100 meters;
  • above residential property if the drone or model aircraft weighs more than 0.25 kilograms or if it is able to receive, transmit, or record optical, acoustic, or radio signals;
  • in controlled airspace;
  • within 100 meters of or above hospitals.

The aviation authority may grant an exception to the general prohibitions in justified cases.

For more information visit Luftfahrt Bundesamt (LBA).

Norway

Use of drones is regulated by Luftfartstilsynet Civil Aviation Authority Norway.  There are three operator categories, based on weight and flight.

RO1
RO 1 operators must notify the CAA Norway before starting up any new undertaking. Such notification shall contain information about the undertaking’s name, address and contact information, as well as information about the type of aircraft that will be used.

An RO 1 undertaking is an undertaking in which aircraft

  • with an MTOM of up to 2.5 kg and
  • a maximum speed of 60 knots
  • will be operated exclusively within VLOS during daylight hours and subject to fixed safety distances

RO2

RO 2 operators must obtain a license from the CAA Norway before starting up an undertaking. The application must be accompanied by a risk analysis and an operations manual.

An RO 2 undertaking is an undertaking in which aircraft

  • with an MTOM of up to 25 kg and
  • a maximum speed of 80 knots
  • will be used for VLOS or EVLOS operations during daylight hours and subject to fixed safety distances

RO3

RO 3 operators must obtain a license from the CAA Norway before starting up an undertaking. The application must be accompanied by a risk analysis and an operations manual.

An RO 3 undertaking is an undertaking in which the aircraft

  • have an MTOM of 25 kg or more, or
  • a maximum speed of 80 knots, or
  • is operated by a turbine engine, or
  • will be used for BLOS operations at altitudes of more than 120 metres, or
  • will operate in controlled airspace at altitudes of more than 120 metres, or
  • will operate over or in the vicinity of crowds of people other than in the cases mentioned in Section 51 third paragraph.

For more information visit Luftfartstilsynet Civil Aviation Authority Norway.

Switzerland

For the operation of drones and model aircraft with a weight of more than 30 kilograms a permit has to be obtained from the FOCA. In each individual case the FOCA specifies the applicable requirements and operating conditions. The criteria for the operation of drones and model aircraft with a weight of up to 30 kilograms are specified in the DETEC Ordinance on Special Categories of Aircraft.

  • If an operator wants to incorporate auxiliary devices such as binoculars or video goggles in order to extend the natural visual range, a permit has to be obtained from the FOCA (Licensing procedure).
  • Without exception, the operation of drones and model aircraft is strictly prohibited within game reserves and bird sanctuaries.
  • The recording of aerial images is permitted as long as the operator duly observes the regulations governing the protection of military installations. The operator must also observe the principle of protection of privacy and the provisions of the Federal Data Protection Act.
  • In principle, drones may not be operated above, or within a radius of 100 metres from, gatherings of people (Further information and licensing procedure).
  • Anyone who operates a drone or model aircraft with a weight of more than 500 grams is required to take out liability insurance cover in the amount of at least 1 million Swiss francs to cover any damages that may be caused.
  • Restrictions apply with respect to the operation of drones and model aircraft in the vicinity of airfields and airports. For example, it is prohibited to operate such devices at a distance of less than 5 kilometres from runways.
  • Cantonal and municipal authorities may impose additional restrictions on the use of unmanned aircraft (Example of the Canton of Geneva).
  • As before, a permit does not have to be obtained from the FOCA for public air shows at which exclusively model aircraft and drones are on show.

For more information visit the Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA).

United Kingdom

Regulations are contained within the Air Navigation Order 2016 (ANO 2016) and there are specific steps that must be taken if a drone is being flown for commercial operations.

  • You must have a Permission issued by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) before you conduct any commercial operations with your drone.
  • Applications should be made on the standard form SRG 1320 and information should also be supplied about the scope of the operation and where and when it will take place. In the majority of cases, only the ‘standard’ CAA permission is granted and this favours aircraft weighing no more than 7kg (15 lbs). Any aircraft weighing more than 20kg (44 lbs) are subject to a more involved process and are more difficult to approve. How to apply for a Permission.

Further Guidance on drone operations within UK airspace can be found at the UK guidance document CAP 722.

Oceania

Australia

Drones under 2kg need to notify CASA at least five business days before their first commercial flight and agree to operate by the standard operating conditions and the guidance in advisory circular (AC) 101-10.

Under the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) weighing 2kg or less must fly:

  • less than 400 feet (121m) in a controlled airspace (generally meaning any populated area)
  • only in good weather conditions; not into a cloud or at night.
  • more than 10m horizontally and 30 feet (9 metres) vertically of a person (except people
  • operating the drone) or boat or building
  • at a height far enough over a large group of people that if the drone failed or any of its components fall, they will not land on people
  • clear of prohibited or restricted areas (such as an aerodrome or restricted military areas)

If you want to fly a drone commercially in Australia weighing more than 2kg, then you will need to obtain a remote pilot license (RePL), and an RPA operator’s certificate (ReOC).

For detailed information or for certification, visit the Civil Aviation Safety Authority website.

New Zealand

The Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand (CAA) oversees the use of drones in New Zealand:

  • RPAS weighing between 15 and 25 kg must be constructed or inspected, approved and operated under the authority of a person or association approved for this purpose by the Director of Civil Aviation.
  • For RPAS over 25kg you must submit an ‘exposition’ showing that you have identified hazards and risks of your operation, and will always mitigate those risks. Each application will be considered on its merit.
  • An operator must not use airspace above people unless they have the consent of people below the flight.
  • An operator must not use airspace above an area of property unless prior consent has been obtained from any persons occupying that property or the property owner.

You can apply to the CAA to work though different options with an operator and/or to relax or remove one or both of the consent requirements altogether.

For more information visit the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand.

Asia

Hong Kong

The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) is responsible for processing applications for non-recreational operations of drones within Hong Kong.

Application

  • An application for operating UAS shall be submitted to the CAD well before the intended date of operation. The electronic form is accessible through this link.
  • In accordance with the Air Transport (Licensing of Air Services) Regulations (Chapter 448A of the Laws of Hong Kong) Regulation 22, the applicant is also required to submit an Application for Permit for use of aircraft for the provision of air service – Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).
  • The operator is required to assess the risks involved and to provide a copy of an insurance policy that appropriately insures the operator in respect of third party risks which may be incurred.

Pilot Qualification
Evidence of pilot competency is required when making an application for permission to operate UAS

Operations Manual

  • The UAS operator is required to submit an operations manual covering the procedures to be followed for all envisaged operations of the UAS. This document is a key requirement to enable CAD to accurately assess the application and the safety case before deciding whether to grant a permission.
  • Guidance for the compilation of the UAS operations manual can be downloaded here.

Communication with ATC

  • The UAS operator shall inform the CAD/Aerodrome Supervisor before launching and on completion of the UAS operation.
  • The UAS operator shall provide his/her contact phone number to the CAD/Aerodrome Supervisor, who may instruct to stop the operation when necessary.

Japan

The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MILT) has issued the following regulations for drone use in Japan:

Prohibited Airspace for Flight
Any person who intends to operate a UAV in the following airspace is required to obtain permission from the Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

  • Airspace around airports and above certain heights above ground level.
  • Above densely populated areas (4,000 people per square kilometer or more).

Operational Limitations
Any person who intends to operate a UAV is required to follow the operational conditions listed below, unless approved by the Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

  • Operation of UAVs in the daytime.
  • Operation of UAVs within Visual Line of Sight (VLOS).
  • Maintenance of a certain operating distance between UAVs and persons or properties on the ground/ water surface.
  • Do not operate UAVs over event sites where many people gather.
  • Do not transport hazardous materials such as explosives by UAV.
  • Do not drop any objects from UAVs.

For more information visit the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

Africa

South Africa

An RPA must be registered and may only be operated in terms of Part 101 of the South African Civil Aviation Regulations.

Do not fly/operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft, or toy aircraft 50 m or closer from:

  • Any person or group of persons (like sports field, road races, schools, social events, etc.)
  • Any property without permission from the property owner.

Unless approved by the SACAA, DO NOT fly/operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft or toy aircraft:

  • Near manned aircraft
  • 10 km or closer to an aerodrome (airport, helipad, airfield)
  •  Weighing more than 7 kg
  • In controlled airspace
  • In restricted airspace
  • In prohibited airspace.

Do not fly/operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft, or toy aircraft higher than 150 ft from the ground, unless approved by the Director of Civil Aviation of the SACAA.

For more information visit the South African Civil Aviation Authority.

About Skyvireo

Skyvireo.com is a Global Media Desk company, dedicated to providing clients with the highest quality, most cost-effective drone services around the world. Our constant striving for perfection in the way we provide drone services has led to new and exciting ways to better serve our customers. Above all, our aim is to provide clients with a hassle-free experience that will save them time, money, and eliminate frustration.

Any business can take advantage of drone technology

What do land surveyors, news reporters, real estate agents, construction companies, first responders, inspection specialists, filmmakers, and farmers all have in common? Drones!

Whether you call them UAV’s, UFO’s, or Tiny Flying Robots, drone popularity and adoption has been exponential of late. Although they are still in their infancy with regards to mass adoption and usage, drones have already demonstrated their value in niche industry applications. In both public and private sector organizations drones are saving companies time and money by easily performing duties that were once very time consuming with difficult logistics.

Let’s take a look at bridge inspection. In a nutshell, bridge inspectors climb bridges in order to test the bridge’s foundation integrity. As you can imagine, this is a very time consuming process, climbing up and down one beam at a time. In this particular case, drones can be retrofitted with a high quality gimbal that allows inspectors to view the bridge with the same detail as if they had climbed it. The time savings here means more money for the business and less risk for the inspector, a win-win if you will.

There are countless other ways that companies are benefitting from drones ranging from rush hour deliveries to surveying a hard to reach real estate. Drones have the most impact in areas where man cannot easily reach or cannot perform their duty in a timely manner.

Whether you have photography, cinematography, or data acquisition needs, businesses of all types are encouraged to become more educated on the vast opportunities drones present. Aerial surveying, film and TV, real estate, marketing professionals, construction companies, first responders, and insurance agencies are all great candidates. Drone adoption is inevitable due to their ability to increase work efficiency and productivity, while mitigating risks and decreasing workload, improving accuracy, and improving customer service.

About Skyvireo

Skyvireo.com is a Global Media Desk company, dedicated to providing clients with the highest quality, most cost-effective drone services around the world. Our constant striving for perfection in the way we provide drone services has led to new and exciting ways to better serve our customers. Above all, our aim is to provide clients with a hassle-free experience that will save them time, money, and eliminate frustration.

Trends - Drone Photography Services on the Rise

Trends: Drone Photography Services on the Rise

Some of the most stunning images and footage are now being captured through drone technology. Although aerial photography and footage are nothing new, access to drone services have made these types of shots affordable and streamlined. Marketers, ad executives, producers, and even construction professionals are hiring drone pilots to capture new innovative content by using angles and shots that were not previously possible.

Marketing Trend: Aerial Photography Services

No matter what industry you are in, drones are available to capture stunning aerial images that offer a new kind of visual language. Some of the hottest trends for 2017 include experimenting with 360-panoramas, night skylines, and top-view portraits. Drones are a great way to elevate any media project whether it’s for print or online.

Video Production Trend: Aerial Cinematography Services

Aerial footage is becoming an indispensable part of video productions. Drones offer creative ways to give companies a competitive edge, like filming inside a factory to show off its workforce and machinery. Television and film productions like BBC’s Planet Earth use drone technology to capture dramatic footage in 4k revealing adrenaline-filled action sequences and 360-degree bird’s eye views.

Fastest Growing Trend: Drone Mapping Services

Drone mapping is utilized in a variety of industries including, agriculture, inspection, construction, and mining, to help with efficiency. Drone mapping technology is quicker and cheaper than older methods, and the demand for this service is growing rapidly. Aerial mapping is a needful tool during all phases of construction projects and other commercial use.

About Skyvireo

Skyvireo.com is a Global Media Desk company, dedicated to providing clients with the highest quality, most cost-effective drone services around the world. Our constant striving for perfection in the way we provide drone services has led to new and exciting ways to better serve our customers. Above all, our aim is to provide clients with a hassle-free experience that will save them time, money, and eliminate frustration.

Story Behind the Shoot: Michelin Earthmover Tires

Story Behind the Shoot: Michelin Earthmover Tires  

Earlier this year the Global Media Desk was proud to be a part of the latest Michelin production shoot. The new campaign shows the world from the eyes of a mine operator and highlights Michelin’s Earthmover XD3 tire technology. For this elaborate shoot our highly-skilled production and aerial crews in Canada joined the Michelin creative team to deliver an awe-inspiring video. We asked Dave Janse Van Rensburg, our Global Project Specialist, how the project unfolded.

Dave Janse Van Rensburg - Global Project Specialist
Dave Janse Van Rensburg – Global Project Specialist

How did the client reach us?
We received a job request from one of our regular clients in Europe to help set up a local camera crew in Canada to shoot a new marketing campaign for Michelin. They have worked with us before and knew we could deliver very complicated shoots.

What was challenging about this project?
The client wanted to film at an active mine where the environment is often unpredictable. We had to work around multiple issues surrounding the location and obtain the correct documents and permits for both land and aerial filming.

How long did it take to get everything in place for the shoot? 
We had two-months from start to finish. The location changed three times between two countries before the final location was selected in Princeton, British Columbia. We worked with the local authority to assist the client in locking the location down and minimized problems on the day of the shoot. Our team was on par!

What equipment was used for the project?
We used multiple camera set-ups with a variety of equipment such as the Sony A7, Panasonic Gh4, and a GoPro for the aerial and time-lapse shots to achieve a visually stunning result the client was looking for.

Did we meet our clients expectations?
Absolutely. They were extremely happy with the results and with our level of service. This was the third campaign we have been a part of in a row.

 

The latest video campaign from Michelin of their all new Earthmover XDR3 tires.

Need help planning your next production or project?

Let us help! At the Global Media Desk we specialize in bringing your visions to life. We only work with the top regional professionals in such varied fields as video production, photography, and film & video crews. Please contact us with any questions you may have about shooting in Canada or any country around the world. You can also request a free online quote to see how we can make your project a complete success.

Follow us on social media for news, advice, info, and tips about international film production, photography, and language services:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglobalmediadesk 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalmediadesk
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Globalmediadesk
Instagram: http://instagram.com/globalmediadesk


Credits:
The Global Media Desk / Production
Jean Pierre François / Director
Maxime Moulin / Director of Photography
Frederic Mabrut / Production Manager
Executive Producer / Florence Furic
Production Office Coordinator / Apolline Roussel
Associate Producer / Dave Van Rensburg
Location Manager / Dale Rechner
Filip Smola / Media Wrangler
Dima Kolesnyk/ Grip
Justin Hennevink / Drone Team Manager
Tyler McDougall / Drone Pilot
Jacob Crawford / Ground Supervisor
Editor/ David Chambriard
Colorist / Chloé Vialaneix
Graphic Designer / Arnaud Lambert
Original Music: Thomas Verovski
Sound Design / Thomas Roche
Earthmover Tires expert: Celine Faure 

New Filming Incentives in the Czech Republic

New Filming Incentives in the Czech Republic

Earlier this year the Czech Republic introduced new filming incentives in an effort to boost its already booming international film production. Nestled in the heart of Europe, the Czech Republic often attracts foreign production due to its ability to double for more expensive cities like Paris and London. Plus, access to highly experienced, local crews and stunning locations make it a worthwhile destination for your next filming project.

Current Filming Incentives

In 2010, the Czech government introduced an incentive scheme offering a 20 percent cash rebate on qualifying local spend, plus an additional 10 percent for international spending that applies to film and TV, including all postproduction work.

New Financial Incentives

To continue boosting the international film sector, the Czech government approved an amendment to the audiovisual law in May of 2016 that allows applicants to file for a rebate any time of the year.

Also, the National Fund of Cinematography allocated an additional $33 million more per year from the state budget over the next three years. The new incentives will take effect on January 1, 2017.

Since the rebate was introduced in 2010, the Czech government has paid out more than $80 million in rebates to more than 150 film and TV projects.

More on the Horizon

On September 15, Prague’s city council approved a new fund called “Prague in Film,” which provides financial support to both feature films for international distribution in cinemas as well as for TV movies and series to be broadcast on foreign television stations. The essential condition is that the project portrays Prague as herself, and not as a stand-in for another city.

The Czech government is also in talks to raise the cash rebate to 25 percent in effort to remain competitive. However, no word whether this will happen soon.

For more information on incentives please visit Czech Film Commission.

Local Crews in the Czech Republic

The Global Media Desk provides the finest, most respected, local production professionals in the Czech Republic. Your satisfaction is our number one priority and that is why we never sacrifice on quality. No matter what you are looking for, we have the best local production services for you — from single technicians to large, fully-equipped crews for preproduction, production, and onwards through to post. Fill out our free online quote to find out how we can help you with your production needs.

Recent Productions

Here are a few of the big international TV and film productions currently shooting in the Czech Republic:

Knightfall for History Channel chronicles the events leading up to the persecution, downfall and burning at the stake of the Knights Templar.

Genius anthology series for National Geographic Channel about Albert Einstein

Underworld: Blood Wars fifth installment of the ‘Underworld’ franchise

The Ring, Bollywood romantic road movie

Anthropoid wartime thriller based on a true story of the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, the SS general who was the author of the Nazis’ “Final Solution”.

About Us

Let us help! At the Global Media Desk we specialize in bringing your visions to life. We only work with the top regional professionals in such varied fields as video production, photography, and film & video crews. Please contact us with any questions you may have about shooting in the Czech Republic or any country around the world. You can also request a free online quote to see how we can make your project a complete success.

Follow us on social media for news, advice, info, and tips about international film production, photography, and language services:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglobalmediadesk
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalmediadesk
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Globalmediadesk
Instagram: http://instagram.com/globalmediadesk

Sundance Returning to Cuba with Film Forward Program

Sundance Returning to Cuba with Film Forward Program

The Sundance Institute is headed to the island of Cuba this week, inviting students, artists, and film lovers to attend screenings and Q&A sessions to acclaimed independent films. Discussions are open to the public as part of Sundance Film Forward starting on July 14-16.

Sundance will screen “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” with novelist/screenwriter Jesse Andrews and “Meru” with director Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi at venues across Havana. These events are part of the Institute’s ongoing programs in Cuba that started back in 1989. Late last year the Institute visited Cuba to present a suite of programs in screenwriting, producing, film music, and documentary editing, in a new partnership with the International Festival of New Latin American Cinema and La Escuela Internacional De Cine Y TV (EICTV).

Sundance Film Festival touring program is designed for students and artist 18-24 years of age to excite and cultivate new audiences for independent film and enhance awareness of shared stories across borders.

About Global Media Desk

At the Global Media Desk we specialize in bringing your visions to life. We only work with the top regional professionals in such varied fields as video production, photography, and film & video crews. Please contact us with any questions you may have about shooting in a specific country or request a free online quote to see how we can make your projects a complete success.

Follow us on social media for news, advice, info, and tips about international film production, photography, and language services:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglobalmediadesk 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalmediadesk
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Globalmediadesk
Instagram: http://instagram.com/globalmediadesk

Resources:
http://www.sundance.org/blogs/news/2016-free-film-screenings-students-cuba

Location Tips: Video Production in Abu Dhabi

Location Tips: Video Production in Abu Dhabi

From the “Fast and Furious” to the “Star Wars” movie franchises, Abu Dhabi is fast becoming the go-to location for film and tv production. Occupying more than 80 percent of the United Arab Emirates’ total land area, Abu Dhabi provides a variety of spectacular geographical locations to fit all types of filming needs. Here are our top five reasons why Abu Dhabi is a hot video production destination for 2016.

Filming Incentives

A very generous filming incentive of 30% cash back on everything production companies spend in the city makes Abu Dhabi an attractive option for filming. Plus, the Abu Dhabi Film Commission also offers free location scouting services, no sales tax, and help with securing permits.

Change of Venue

Looking for the perfect desert? That is what director J.J. Abrams found in Abu Dhabi for his latest feature film “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” Abu Dhabi also has a vast range of unique locations including pristine coastline with year-round sunshine, wild desert, natural oasis, and iconic architecture. All make stunning backdrops for filming, TV commercial spots, and photo shoots.

Enjoy some downtime

Every production needs a chance to relax and unwind and Abu Dhabi has the perfect venues. With six pay-and-play, certified PGA professional golf courses your crew will get the recharge they need to remain focused and productive.

Aerial/Drone Footage

Unlike many countries, the UAE government embraces the use of drone technology, but the Abu Dhabi Film Commission does require a permit for media production drone use in the Emirates. Keep in mind that cultural influences also play a role in what is allowed to be captured and local custom frowns upon capturing images of woman and children without consent, even in public places.

Climate

Abu Dhabi has a sub-tropical, arid climate where temperatures range from 10C (50F) in winter to around 48C (118F) in summer. The best time to plan a shoot is a generous 6 month range from November to April.  Temperatures during this period are around 24C (75F) during the day, the ideal temperature to be filming or enjoying the outdoors.

Ready to plan your next production or project in Abu Dhabi?

Let us help! At the Global Media Desk we specialize in bringing your visions to life. We only work with the top regional professionals in such varied fields as video production, photography, and film & video crews. Please contact us with any questions you may have about shooting in Abu Dhabi or any country around the world. You can also request a free online quote to see how we can make your project a complete success.

Follow us on social media for news, advice, info, and tips about international film production, photography, and language services:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglobalmediadesk 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalmediadesk
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Globalmediadesk
Instagram: http://instagram.com/globalmediadesk

Photo Credit:
 Abu Dhabi UAE by Gilles

Resources:
http://money.cnn.com/2015/12/15/media/star-wars-abu-dhabi-film-tax-credits/index.html
http://www.film.gov.ae/en/filming-in-abu-dhabi/introduction

The Olympics Games- Rio 2016 by the Numbers

The Olympics Games: Rio 2016 by the Numbers

For 17 days this summer the world will come together to watch the biggest sporting event on the planet. Brought to you by over 140,000 TV and broadcast stations around the world, let’s take a look at the numbers projected to break broadcasting and social media records.

The Olympic Games: Rio 2016 by the Numbers

Need Coverage for an Upcoming Sporting Event?

Global Media Desk has local crews, photographers, and satellite services in Brazil and throughout the world, who are ready to get you the coverage you need. Find out more about this year’s biggest sporting event and how Global Media Desk can help: http://videoproductionbrazil.com/sports-events-production-services/.

About Global Media Desk

Global Media Desk has been providing on-demand, high-quality, local satellite and up-link services, production crews, photographers, and interpreters in Brazil and around the world for over 15 years. We have seen and done it all, so please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have about events in a specific country or region. Ready to hire the best local crew for you project? Fill out our free quote form and you can have access to the highest-quality crews. It is as simple as point. click. covered.

 

DISCLAIMER: “Olympic”, “Olympic Games”, and “Rio 2016” are registered properties of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this site. Any reference to “Olympic”, “Olympic Games”, or “Rio 2016” is used purely for editorial and informational purposes.

Resources:
ZenithOptimedia
BMI Research
OlympicGames.org

Photo Credits:
Antimarino Track Field by David Fulmer on Flickr
FIFA FanFest Cuiabá by Paulisson Miura on Flickr
Beach by Brazil Women’s Beach Volleyball on Flickr
Morro do Pão de Açúcar by Rodrigo Soldon on Flickr